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Pakistan’s political economy: State, class and social change - Detailseite

Grunddaten
Veranstaltungsart Seminar Veranstaltungsnummer 53741
Semester WiSe 2020/21 SWS 2
Rhythmus keine Übernahme Moodle-Link  
Veranstaltungsstatus Freigegeben für Vorlesungsverzeichnis  Freigegeben  Sprache englisch
Belegungsfristen - Eine Belegung ist online erforderlich Zentrale Nachfrist    02.11.2020 - 05.11.2020   
Zentrale Frist (späterer Beginn)    01.09.2020 - 28.10.2020    aktuell
Veranstaltungsformat Digital

Termine

Gruppe 1
Tag Zeit Rhythmus Dauer Raum Raum-
plan
Lehrperson Status Bemerkung fällt aus am Max. Teilnehmer
Fr. 14:00 bis 16:00 wöch 06.11.2020 bis 26.02.2021      findet statt     25
Gruppe 1:


Zugeordnete Person
Zugeordnete Person Zuständigkeit
Bajwa, Sadia , Dr.
Studiengänge
Abschluss Studiengang LP Semester
Master of Arts  Global Studies Programme Hauptfach ( Vertiefung: kein LA; POVersion: 2016 )   1 -  
Master of Arts  Süd-u. Südostasienstudien Hauptfach ( Vertiefung: kein LA; POVersion: 2014 )   3 oder 4 je nach Modul  1 -  
Zuordnung zu Einrichtungen
Einrichtung
Kultur-, Sozial- und Bildungswissenschaftliche Fakultät, Institut für Asien- und Afrikawissenschaften
Inhalt
Kurzkommentar

With a focus on contemporary Pakistan, this course examines the Pakistan’s political economy through its history with respect to recent social transformations and dynamics. Examining gender, middle-classes, media, youth, urbanization and new spaces of capital, the course seeks to understand how the nature of the state and its relation to society and class has changed since 1947.

Kommentar

With a focus on contemporary Pakistan, this course examines the Pakistan’s political economy through its history with respect to recent social transformations and dynamics. Examining gender, middle-classes, media, youth, urbanization and new spaces of capital and consumption, the course seeks to understand how the nature of the state and its relation to society and class has changed since 1947. These are questions that have been marginal in dominant academic narratives that have been concerned with the fraught relationship of Islam and nation, the place of political Islam then and now, and the post 9/11 themes of geo-politics, terrorism and extremism.

 

Pakistan is known to the world as that part of the Indian subcontinent that went down the road of authoritarianism after the colonial rule ended in 1947 and two nation-states emerged from partitioned British India. While independent India came to be known as the ‘largest democracy in the world’, Pakistan’s trajectory is presented an ostensibly stark contrast. After 1947, Pakistan experienced the almost immediate ascendency of what is commonly termed as the military-bureaucratic oligarchy. The political economy of Pakistan since its inception has undergone fundamental transformations that have remained understudied and undertheorized.

 

While there is no doubt that the military, bureaucracy, propertied classes, (and global capital) dominate Pakistan, beneath the surface these formations are characterized by changing power dynamics. At the same time the state is dependent on legitimacy from below. Pakistan’s contemporary political economy and state-society dynamics are shaped by social forces that cannot be encompassed by in a simple bifurcation into civil-military relations.

 

Language: The course will be taught in English but students can hand in assignments in German if they choose. Most readings will be in English.

 

 

MA Moderne Süd- und Südostasienstudien (StPO 2014)

Modul 3: Politische und soziale Strukturen in Süd- und Südostasien (3LP)

Modul 9: Vertiefung Regionalwissenschaften (4LP)

 

MA Global Studies

Modul 2: 3LP

 

 

Literatur

McCartney & Zaidi (eds.), New Perspectives on Pakistan's Political Economy. State, Class and Social Change, Cambridge et al.: Cambridge University Press, 2019.

 

Akbar S. Zaidi, Military, Civil Society and Democratization in Pakistan, Lahore: Vanguard Books, 2011, 184-218.

 

Aqil Shah, Pakistan: Civil Society in the Service of an Authoritarian State, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2004, 357-388.

Bemerkung

Online course with a combination of synchronic sessions and asynchronic course work.

Prüfung

Keine Prüfung.

Strukturbaum

Die Veranstaltung wurde 4 mal im Vorlesungsverzeichnis WiSe 2020/21 gefunden:

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Unter den Linden 6 | D-10099 Berlin